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Fracture

Fracture

R.N H Hospital Pvt Ltd recognized this long ago and today it is a leading tertiary referral trauma center in central india.

What is a fracture?

Fracture is a medical condition where the continuity of the bone / cartilage is broken and treatment plan depends on the type of fracture and location. Most fractures happen when a bone is impacted by more force or pressure than it can support. Fractures can be simple / compound / comminuted and may be associated with single bone /multiple bone fractures ( polytrauma ).

SYMPTOMS OF A FRACTURE ?

Most fractures are accompanied by intense pain when the initial injury occurs. It may become worse when you move or touch the injured area.
Other potential symptoms of a fracture include:
  A Snap Or Grinding Sound When The Injury Occurs
  Swelling, Redness, And Bruising In The Injured Area
  Difficulty Supporting Weight With The Injured Area
  Visible Deformity In The Injured Area
In some cases, you may see broken bone poking through your skin.
If you suspect you have a fracture, seek medical help immediately.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF FRACTURE ?

Fractures can be classified as closed or open, as well as incomplete or complete.

Closed vs. open fractures

A closed fracture is also called a simple fracture. In a closed fracture, the broken bone doesn’t break your skin.
An open fracture is also called a compound fracture. In an open fracture, the ends of the broken bone tear your skin. When your bone and other internal tissues are exposed, it puts you at higher risk of infection.

INCOMPLETE VS. COMPLETE FRACTURES

Incomplete fracture

In an incomplete fracture, your bone doesn’t break completely. In other words, it cracks without breaking all the way through. Types of incomplete fracture include:
  Hairline Fracture, In Which Your Bone Is Broken In A Thin Crack
  Greenstick Fracture, In Which Your Bone Is Broken On One Side, While The Other Side Is Bent
  Buckle Or Torus Fracture, In Which Your Bone Is Broken On One Side And A Bump Or Raised Buckle Develops On The Other Side

Complete fracture

In a complete fracture, your bone breaks completely. It’s snapped or crushed into two or more pieces. Types of complete fracture include:
  Single Fracture, In Which Your Bone Is Broken In One Place Into Two Pieces
  Comminuted Fracture, In Which Your Bone Is Broken Or Crushed Into Three Or More Pieces
  Compression Fracture, In Which Your Bone Collapses Under Pressure
  Nondisplaced Fracture, In Which Your Bone Breaks Into Pieces That Stay In Their Normal Alignment
  Displaced Fracture, In Which Your Bone Breaks Into Pieces That Move Out Of Their Normal Alignment
  Segmental Fracture, In Which Your Bone Is Broken In Two Places In A Way That Leaves At Least One Segment Floating And Unattached

Incomplete fractures are more common in children. Their bones are softer than those of adults. As a result, they’re more likely to bend than break. Complete fractures can happen at any age.

WHAT CAUSES A FRACTURE?

You can develop a fracture when your bone is impacted with greater pressure or force than it can support. This force usually occurs suddenly or is very intense. The strength of the force determines the severity of the fracture.

FALLS

DIRECT STRIKES TO YOUR BODY

TRAUMATIC EVENTS

INJURIES FROM SPORTS

ARE OLDER

HAVE OSTEOPOROSIS

ENDOCRINE OR INTESTINAL DISORDERS

ARE TAKING CORTICOSTEROIDS

ARE PHYSICALLY INACTIVE

DRINKING ALCOHOL & SMOKE

WHO IS AT RISK OF A FRACTURE?

Anyone can be experience a fracture. But you’re more likely to develop one if you have brittle bones, or low bone density. You’re more likely to develop brittle bones if you:

HOW IS A FRACTURE DIAGNOSED?

If you suspect you have a fracture, get medical attention immediately. Your doctor will likely ask you about your symptoms and perform a visual examination of the injured area. They may ask you to move the area in certain ways to check for pain or other signs of injury.
If they think you may have a fracture, your doctor will likely order X-rays. X-rays are the most common method of fracture diagnosis. They can create images of your bone and reveal breaks or other signs of damage. X-rays also help determine fracture type and location.
In some instances, your doctor may also order magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography scans (CT or CAT scan) to examine your bones or surrounding tissues.


If you experience a fracture, its location and severity will help determine how long it takes to heal. Your age and medical history can also affect your recovery process. Certain medical conditions may impair your body’s ability to mend broken bones.
It may take several weeks, or sometimes months, for your fracture to heal. In most cases, the pain will subside before the healing process is complete. You will likely need to restrict movement of the injured area while it mends. You may not be able to participate in some of your normal activities. You may also have to make adjustments to your routine, until you are healed.
Once your fracture is healed, you may be able to return to your normal activities and routine. In some cases, you may need physical therapy. This will help you to regain your normal use of the injured area.
Immobilizing part of your body for a long period of time can cause you to lose muscle strength and range of motion. Physical therapy can help you recover more fully. To promote your recovery, follow your doctor’s medical instructions closely.

You can’t prevent all fractures. But you can work to keep your bones strong so they’ll be less susceptible to damage.
To maintain your bone strength, consume a nutritious diet, including foods that are rich in calcium and vitamin D.
It’s also important to exercise regularly.
Weight-bearing exercises are particularly helpful for building and maintaining bone strength.
Examples include walking, hiking, running, dancing, and weight training.